Posts tagged google
Styled Maps Using Google Maps API Version 3 - You probably know a lot of these tips if you’ve done some Google Maps integration work, but you may not know that you can change the colors of land, water, and road elements, simplify or remove roads, remove text labels, and display pseudo-3D buildings.

Styled Maps Using Google Maps API Version 3 - You probably know a lot of these tips if you’ve done some Google Maps integration work, but you may not know that you can change the colors of land, water, and road elements, simplify or remove roads, remove text labels, and display pseudo-3D buildings.

Posted on October 18, 2010 · 7 notes
Google TV - This space is about to explode. With so many high-caliber players competing, they’re going to have to bring their A game to survive. End result = consumers win.

Google TV - This space is about to explode. With so many high-caliber players competing, they’re going to have to bring their A game to survive. End result = consumers win.

Posted on October 4, 2010 · 35 notes
Ricardo Cabello (aka. Mr. Doob) has a great writeup discussing the making of The Wilderness Downtown, the Arcade Fire HTML 5 experiment. It’s an absolute web polymath’s treasure chest with jewels including Javascript sequencers, 3D rendering, geocoding, issues with WebGL and CoreGraphics, boid simulations (for the bird flocks), tweening, and color correction (for which the code above was a part of).

Ricardo Cabello (aka. Mr. Doob) has a great writeup discussing the making of The Wilderness Downtown, the Arcade Fire HTML 5 experiment. It’s an absolute web polymath’s treasure chest with jewels including Javascript sequencers, 3D rendering, geocoding, issues with WebGL and CoreGraphics, boid simulations (for the bird flocks), tweening, and color correction (for which the code above was a part of).

Posted on September 17, 2010 · 11 notes
As part of their recent design refresh, Google removed almost all underlines from links on the search results page. They kept the primary link titles underlined while cleaning up secondary and supportive UI links for reduced visual clutter.

Methinks the Google News team could benefit from some of this text-decoration:none goodness.

As part of their recent design refresh, Google removed almost all underlines from links on the search results page. They kept the primary link titles underlined while cleaning up secondary and supportive UI links for reduced visual clutter.

Methinks the Google News team could benefit from some of this text-decoration:none goodness.

Posted on May 13, 2010 · 4 notes

Clever promotional video for Google Chrome Extensions.

Posted on April 26, 2010 · 8 notes

Peter Kasting, UI engineer for Google Chrome, gives a rundown on just how much work they’ve put into making the user interface exceptionally fast and responsive.

Two things that I found particularly interesting:

  1. Back when the project was just starting and the browser did almost nothing, they benchmarked the startup time performance (again, for an app that was basically a skeleton) and then set a policy that no future change could ever slow the startup time below that threshold. I can’t imagine how challenging that must have been.

  2. It was really exiting to hear that Google, with their reputation for objective and scientifically measurable test results, embraced the ideas of perceived performance (how responsive something is, regardless of actual performance) and cognitive friction. Cognitive Friction is a term that Alan Cooper came up with in The Inmates Are Running the Asylum to describe the mental energy required to decipher an interface in order to determine how to proceed. In other words, a UI can be blazingly fast from a technical standpoint, but it doesn’t matter if it takes a user 17 seconds to find the control they need.

Posted on April 16, 2010 · 4 notes

Google Earth adds even more awesome with amazingly detailed 3D buildings of New York City.

Posted on April 15, 2010 · 2 notes

Google’s master plan of modeling the entire planet takes a step closer using crowdsourcing with their Model Your Town Competition - the finalists seen here.

Posted on April 1, 2010 · 3 notes

Vimium - The Hacker's Browser

A Chrome extension that provides keyboard-based navigation with in the spirit of the Vim editor.

I’m no longer a Vim power user, but its keybindings are still deeply ingrained in my muscle memory. Some of my most frequently used sites use the J/K keys for up/down navigation (Gmail, Google Reader, Tumblr, etc.), but this extension will allow you to do so on any site (and allows you to disable the extension on sites that already make use of keyboard navigtion).

The developer went way beyond the bare minimum:

h       scroll left
j       scroll down
k       scroll up
l       scroll right
gg      scroll to top of the page
G       scroll to bottom of the page
,    scroll down a page
,    scroll up a page
   scroll down a full page
   scroll up a full page
f       activate link hints mode to open in current tab
F       activate link hints mode to open in new tab
r       reload
gf      view source
zi      zoom in
zo      zoom out
/       enter find mode -- type your search query and hit enter to search or esc to cancel
n       cycle forward to the next find match
N       cycle backward to the previous find match
i       enter insert mode -- all commands will be ignored until you hit esc to exit
y       copy the current url to the clipboard
ba, H         go back in history
fw, fo, L     go forward in history
J, gT      go one tab left
K, gt      go one tab right
t          create tab
d          close current tab
u          restore closed tab (i.e. unwind the 'd' command)
Posted on February 21, 2010 · 7 notes
Posted on January 25, 2010 · 2 notes
Lukas Mathis takes a look at Google’s odd reinvention of the wheel scrollbar in Wave.
Posted on November 16, 2009 · 0 notes

Google Closure in Rails Development Workflow?

Update: I found a promising Rails plugin for this.

I’ve got a couple of projects that I’d be interested in trying out the recently released Closure Tools on. Have any workflow best practices started to surface yet in regards to compiling your app’s Javascript with these tools? The compiler UI is slick in that you can see the results of the compiled code, but I’m thinking you’d want to automate things with the command line tool somehow (rake task, Git pre-commit hook? Maybe with the compiler API on the server?).

Duncan Grazier may be on to something with his comjiler project. I’d be interested in hearing about how people are using the Closure compiler in the wild - Rails apps or otherwise.

Posted on November 9, 2009 · 0 notes

The upcoming Android/Google navigation looks very nice.

Posted on October 28, 2009 · 0 notes

The secrets of Google's design team

Love it or hate it, here’s another look into Google’s data-driven design processes.

Posted on October 19, 2009 · 0 notes

A look at how Google models flu trends.

Posted on October 8, 2009 · Notes